Smells Like Team Spirit: How to Unify a Diverse Team in the Workplace

Smells Like Team Spirit: How to Unify a Diverse Team in the Workplace

I’ve been asked more and more frequently how managers can be sure they are being sensitive and inclusive. In almost all cases, I get the question from well-meaning, but fairly stressed executives, often men, usually in their late 40s to early 50s. They have teams that include women, LGBT members, and international employees. ‘

While they all appreciate and actively look for diversity, they recognize their own limitations in being able to identify opportunities to celebrate and unify a diverse team with such different backgrounds and experiences. While more than 70% of executives are white men, the increasing diversity of

Finding Middle Ground in a Divided Workplace

Finding Middle Ground in a Divided Workplace

I was recently asked to give advice to a professional that was really struggling with the best way to succeed in a divided workplace. She asked:  “At my job, you can tell that employees are divided in many ways. I’m not the type of person to fall into groups because it’s what everyone expects or it’s how you get things done. So, how can I get ahead, as an individual, without compromising my character?”

A divided workplace is tricky business – here’s how to use your head and keep your soul:

It’s totally understandable why you’d like to be a grown-up and

Get Prepared for Gen Z — By Going Back, to the Future

Get Prepared for Gen Z — By Going Back, to the Future

As we round out the second decade of the 21st century, employers are pretty confident that they are finally comfortable with The Millennial Employee. More or less. Like the Y2K fears that entered corporate corridors just before them, they seemed a uniquely turn-of-the-century phenomenon that we only knew we could not fully prepare for.

It turned out that our systems were much more forward compatible than their humans – when’s the last time you heard about the Y2K bug? – who have struggled for over a decade to fully understand and integrate Millennial employees.

To be fair, accommodating three such distinct generations brought unprecedented challenges. So, let’s try four. Because Gen Z has started entering the workforce — and is coming to an interview near you. Are you prepared for Gen Z employees?

High-Performance Employee Burnout: the Cost and the Cure

Let’s face it – everyone loves a rock star employee. Companies are thrilled to have employees who not only meet, but exceed, deadlines or sales goals or budgets.

As long as there aren’t interpersonal or other management-related issues, employers will usually reward these workers with bonuses or promotions, or at worst, let them run on auto-pilot. But there’s a potential downside with an “ain’t broke, don’t fix it” attitude toward these workers – the risk of high-performance employee burnout.

To prevent a rock star from becoming a one-hit wonder, it’s imperative that employers try to identify and prevent burnout.

Things are Tough All Over: Challenges for Working Women Around the World

In the United States, Canada and most of the EU, 46% of the workforce is women. In Zimbabwe and Tanzania, it’s more than 50%. In fact, in more than 80% of the world, women are at least 40% of the workers. We’re past the days when a woman working “outside the home” is remarkable — almost everywhere. The challenges for working women now are not about access to jobs, but success within them — almost everywhere.

The question of challenges for working women worldwide is simply a matter of degree, not of existence.

A 2015 study by Thomson Reuters of

Assessing Global Generational Differences: Is X, Y, Z as easy as 1-2-3?

There are countless articles on the differences in priorities and attitudes across generations, especially in the workforce. Gen Y (or Millennials, as they are often called in the U.S.) is predicted to be 75% of the global workforce by 2025. Whether one finds the conclusions varying, contradictory or cliché is a matter of debate. But what is overwhelmingly true is that these articles are based primarily, if not exclusively, on the US population. But are global generational differences the same as in the United States, which naturally has its own specific cultural and political references?

As the world

Teaching A New Dog Old Tricks – Attracting Younger Talent to “Old” Companies

If we told you that one of the hot new trends for socialising was throwing axes — at a bar, no less – you might tell us that is so early 2018. But if we told you axe-throwing has become an increasingly common corporate event? (Come on, you didn’t see that coming, really. And if you work in the insurance sector, you might not for a while yet.) At best, such unusual corporate-sponsored activities seem inextricably linked with Silicon Valley start-ups. But established, more traditional companies are increasingly realising the importance of modernising their employee recruiting and hiring strategies, in

Trickle-up leadership: It’s time to upgrade your thinking

Since the Great Recession of the late 2000s and early 2010s, trust in leaders and institutions has been consistently eroding or remaining stagnant. In the business world, trust in top management is vital for ensuring that employees internalize the strategies and goals of the entire company. A lack of trust can challenge the efforts of CEOs, top management teams and their Boards of Directors when they are trying to gain broad, sometimes, global followership for growth or transformation plans.

The Typical Approach – Trickle Down

In an effort to build trust and influence the company, CEOs and their teams

Word to the wise: Beware the work crush

It started out professional enough. Well, somewhat.

It was merely acknowledgment of the charisma, potential and talent of a leader with future potential. Whom she also thought was handsome…in a company that didn’t have a large pool of ‘pleasing to the eye’ male leaders. Every time he spoke she was inspired. I mean, who couldn’t help be inspired by his energy, passion, vision (and that smile…)?!

As time went on she continued to amass evidence on his:

  • brilliant (?) leadership potential
  • admire his dashing good looks
  • be enamored by his observations of the market conditions
  • be inspired in his presence

…all the while