Gen X Leaders Should Embrace Millennial Corporate Values. Mostly.

Millennials have changed the workforce in countless ways. That’s not all bad, of course, and Gen X leaders should embrace Millennial corporate values (some of them, anyway). Millennials have changed the face of companies, literally, with more diverse employees. They’ve changed employee expectations, with more emphasis on things they care about, like CSR efforts and a voice in their career. And they generally have questioned – even rejected — many of the professional norms (read: restraints) around dress codes, organization charts and communication style.

Here are three ways that Gen X leaders should embrace Millennial

The Bottom Line on Loftier Goals: It Might Be Gen X who make CSR relevant

As we discussed in an earlier post on Millennial recruiting, 85% of Millennials in the US said they wanted their company to provide CSR opportunities for them, and 64% said they will not work for a company that doesn’t, according to this study. Companies are quickly shifting how they invest in CSR as a necessary part of business. That’s driven by Millennial prioritisation of employee and consumer decision-making. But it might be Gen X who make CSR relevant to the business model, financially, and not just ideologically. They have the track record, and moment-in-time advantages

Get Prepared for Gen Z — By Going Back, to the Future

Get Prepared for Gen Z — By Going Back, to the Future

As we round out the second decade of the 21st century, employers are pretty confident that they are finally comfortable with The Millennial Employee. More or less. Like the Y2K fears that entered corporate corridors just before them, they seemed a uniquely turn-of-the-century phenomenon that we only knew we could not fully prepare for.

It turned out that our systems were much more forward compatible than their humans – when’s the last time you heard about the Y2K bug? – who have struggled for over a decade to fully understand and integrate Millennial employees.

To be fair, accommodating three such distinct generations brought unprecedented challenges. So, let’s try four. Because Gen Z has started entering the workforce — and is coming to an interview near you. Are you prepared for Gen Z employees?

Can’t Get No Satisfaction: Definition of Job Satisfaction by Generation

Recruiting and retaining the right employees has become far more nuanced in the last ten years. There are multiple generations active in the workplace, each filling different needs. But they also have different professional goals. While all would profess they want to feel a sense of motivation, the definition of job satisfaction by generation is particular to each.

Understanding How Job Satisfaction by Generation Differs and Why

See change.

One challenge for employers is simply trying to meet so many needs at once. Understanding the values that will attract the right talent requires a dynamic recruiting and hiring strategy. It also means managing

Assessing Global Generational Differences: Is X, Y, Z as easy as 1-2-3?

There are countless articles on the differences in priorities and attitudes across generations, especially in the workforce. Gen Y (or Millennials, as they are often called in the U.S.) is predicted to be 75% of the global workforce by 2025. Whether one finds the conclusions varying, contradictory or cliché is a matter of debate. But what is overwhelmingly true is that these articles are based primarily, if not exclusively, on the US population. But are global generational differences the same as in the United States, which naturally has its own specific cultural and political references?

As the world

Teaching A New Dog Old Tricks – Attracting Younger Talent to “Old” Companies

If we told you that one of the hot new trends for socialising was throwing axes — at a bar, no less – you might tell us that is so early 2018. But if we told you axe-throwing has become an increasingly common corporate event? (Come on, you didn’t see that coming, really. And if you work in the insurance sector, you might not for a while yet.) At best, such unusual corporate-sponsored activities seem inextricably linked with Silicon Valley start-ups. But established, more traditional companies are increasingly realising the importance of modernising their employee recruiting and hiring strategies, in

Recruiting Responsibly:  Corporate Social Responsibility is Key for Job Seekers

The idea of corporate social responsibility is hardly new. In particular, global and environmentally impactful companies have been historically sensitive to the role of public service. A company that earns billions, seen re-investing some of that wealth, either to the local community or a high profile cause is good PR.

Companies that operate refineries, factories, or other activities that emit exceptional noise or fumes tend to be sensitive to building relationships with local residents. Pharmaceutical organisations have often spearheaded campaigns to address diseases and other medical needs of at-risk communities in developing countries. But what is relatively new is the employee demand

Diversity 2.0? Millennials Define Inclusion Differently. (Surprise.)

You know that Millennials have set themselves apart as having an alluring (maybe) but perplexing (certainly) distinction on almost every dynamic possible. You’d have to be under a rock in a cave on an island not to be aware of the deafening chatter on why – digitalisation, global economies, weather patterns (don’t put it past someone).

In any event, it would be fair to assign a heavy influence to the speed of change – their effortless navigation at a pace in which devices, social media platforms, and even hashtags can become obsolete with startling abruptness. Perhaps they don’t even think of