If generations solve problems differently, how do they find solutions together?

A few years ago we were having a debate at the office about how to approach problems. That’s a wide statement, of course. But the conversation was not about how to solve any issue in particular. The discussion focused more on a certain template to our processes, and how that presupposed other things. How we identify problems, whom we assign the resolution to and why we choose one person over another. Like so many things, these decisions are partly determined by our generational perspective. But generations solve problems differently. So do older decision makers need an overall reset?

As we discussed in an earlier post on Millennial recruiting, 85% of Millennials in the US said they wanted their company to provide CSR opportunities for them, and 64% said they will not work for a company that doesn’t, according to this study. Companies are quickly shifting how they invest in CSR as a necessary part of business. That’s driven by Millennial prioritisation of employee and consumer decision-making. But it might be Gen X who make CSR relevant to the business model, financially, and not just ideologically. They have the track record, and moment-in-time advantages

Can’t Get No Satisfaction: Definition of Job Satisfaction by Generation

Recruiting and retaining the right employees has become far more nuanced in the last ten years. There are multiple generations active in the workplace, each filling different needs. But they also have different professional goals. While all would profess they want to feel a sense of motivation, the definition of job satisfaction by generation is particular to each.

Understanding How Job Satisfaction by Generation Differs and Why

See change.

One challenge for employers is simply trying to meet so many needs at once. Understanding the values that will attract the right talent requires a dynamic recruiting and hiring strategy. It also means managing