High-Performance Employee Burnout: the Cost and the Cure

Let’s face it – everyone loves a rock star employee. Companies are thrilled to have employees who not only meet, but exceed, deadlines or sales goals or budgets.

As long as there aren’t interpersonal or other management-related issues, employers will usually reward these workers with bonuses or promotions, or at worst, let them run on auto-pilot. But there’s a potential downside with an “ain’t broke, don’t fix it” attitude toward these workers – the risk of high-performance employee burnout.

To prevent a rock star from becoming a one-hit wonder, it’s imperative that employers try to identify and prevent burnout.

Things are Tough All Over: Challenges for Working Women Around the World

In the United States, Canada and most of the EU, 46% of the workforce is women. In Zimbabwe and Tanzania, it’s more than 50%. In fact, in more than 80% of the world, women are at least 40% of the workers. We’re past the days when a woman working “outside the home” is remarkable — almost everywhere. The challenges for working women now are not about access to jobs, but success within them — almost everywhere.

The question of challenges for working women worldwide is simply a matter of degree, not of existence.

A 2015 study by Thomson Reuters of

From Slacker to C-Suite – Are Gen X Employees Ready to Lead?

A recent Google search for the keywords “Baby Boomers” yielded 15.9 million results, while “Millennial” produced 264 million hits.

And a search for “Gen X”? 421 million hits.

It may be the only popularity contest Gen X has ever won. The so-called “slacker generation” has long suffered a reputation as underwhelming, without notable ambition or purpose. Since the proliferation of the Gen Y influence, they also are in between two much bigger, much more influential groups. On the other hand, those Google results might reflect some broader metaphor – the Gen X influence is far disproportionate to their number, and their impact

Trickle-up leadership: It’s time to upgrade your thinking

Since the Great Recession of the late 2000s and early 2010s, trust in leaders and institutions has been consistently eroding or remaining stagnant. In the business world, trust in top management is vital for ensuring that employees internalize the strategies and goals of the entire company. A lack of trust can challenge the efforts of CEOs, top management teams and their Boards of Directors when they are trying to gain broad, sometimes, global followership for growth or transformation plans.

The Typical Approach – Trickle Down

In an effort to build trust and influence the company, CEOs and their teams

How tribalism can hurt your company: What to do before it’s too late

The world of business is competitive, there is no doubt about it. The goal of the game is making money: Driving growth and reaping profit. As the competition becomes more intense the stakes get higher and our emotions can often let us down.

In this competitive ‘dog-eat-dog’ environment an inherent human tendency will sometimes emerge. Employees can start to adopt an “us vs. them” attitude, even within the same company. Your teams will then start to compete with each other, and not in the good sense. Different parts of the organization may try to out maneuver each other, sometimes in front