Breaking the Bias: Institutional Racism in Companies

One issue for companies is that companies are made up of people. Seriously – we sometimes speak breathlessly about what a company does as if it is a living breathing thing, be it monster or miracle, making choices independent of any human force. Organisations are not progressive or traditional or inclusive or not; the people who work in them make decisions that support – intentionally or not — a corporate culture and develop a reputation. That said, there are both individual acts and collective choices that happen inside of companies that are different from individual private acts. When

Higher Standards to Hire: Recruiting Diverse Employees
In the two months since the death of George Floyd, the Black Lives Matter movement has swept across America, and frankly, much of the globe. The conversations and the actions that have followed in the wake of Floyd’s death touch almost every element of daily life. Some are more momentous, such as the toppling of Edward Colston into the sea, others more nuanced in personal and professional circles. Many corporations are trying to take active measures to improve how they are recruiting diverse employees. But old patterns can be hard to change, even despite the best efforts.
It’s Not a Small World, After All: Understanding the Needs of a Global Workforce

Generation X executives may struggle more with first-time management challenges than any generation before them. Baby Boomers have also wrestled with the needs of an intergenerational workforce, globalisation of the economy and the digital era. But understanding the needs of a global workforce have become increasingly complex. To recruit and retain a more diverse and more distributed workforce requires understanding and meeting a vaster range of employment preferences of current and potential employees. It can impact decisions from traditional benefits to office arrangements.

Why understanding the
needs of a global workforce is

Men at Work: We need men to mentor women in the workplace

One of the challenges of initiatives regarding promotion of women in the workplace is that it can feel like a chicken and egg problem. Studies show that women in positions of power are more likely than men to hire and promote other women. And there are obvious reasons for women to mentor women. And in the era MeToo, it seems a particularly dicey time to encourage men to mentor women in the workplace. But as I wrote in a prior post about the challenges of female leadership, just 7% of the CEOs in the FTSE 100 are

It’s Lonely At The Top — Why Women CEOs Face More Shareholder Activism

It’s been widely reported that among the FTSE 100, there are more CEOs named David (nine), than CEOs who are women (seven). The problem, of course, is not David (any of them), but Goliath – in this case, not one massive adversary but a number of challenges faced only, or disproportionally, by female CEOs. For example, women CEOs face more shareholder activism than their male counterparts according to an article in the Journal of Applied Psychology. But why?

Shareholder activism is usually a sign of lack of confidence in management, and management’s ultimate leader, the CEO. Assuming shareholders are

Recruiting Responsibly: How Tech Companies Are Using CSR to Increase Gender Diversity

Often when we talk about tech companies, we envision cool, fun places — foosball tables, standing desks, and canteens stocked with fair trade coffee. The stereotype of Silicon Valley might be young, irreverent and international . . . but it’s also very male. Maybe that’s because only 19% of computer science graduates in the U.S. are women.

In an effort to increase female employment, some tech companies are using CSR to increase gender diversity. This might not be an obvious solution. What is the relationship between corporate social responsibility and hiring more women?

Diversity 2.0? Millennials Define Inclusion Differently. (Surprise.)

You know that Millennials have set themselves apart as having an alluring (maybe) but perplexing (certainly) distinction on almost every dynamic possible. You’d have to be under a rock in a cave on an island not to be aware of the deafening chatter on why – digitalisation, global economies, weather patterns (don’t put it past someone).

In any event, it would be fair to assign a heavy influence to the speed of change – their effortless navigation at a pace in which devices, social media platforms, and even hashtags can become obsolete with startling abruptness. Perhaps they don’t even think of