Gen X Leaders Should Embrace Millennial Corporate Values. Mostly.

Millennials have changed the workforce in countless ways. That’s not all bad, of course, and Gen X leaders should embrace Millennial corporate values (some of them, anyway). Millennials have changed the face of companies, literally, with more diverse employees. They’ve changed employee expectations, with more emphasis on things they care about, like CSR efforts and a voice in their career. And they generally have questioned – even rejected — many of the professional norms (read: restraints) around dress codes, organization charts and communication style.

Here are three ways that Gen X leaders should embrace Millennial

Recruiting Responsibly: How Tech Companies Are Using CSR to Increase Gender Diversity

Often when we talk about tech companies, we envision cool, fun places — foosball tables, standing desks, and canteens stocked with fair trade coffee. The stereotype of Silicon Valley might be young, irreverent and international . . . but it’s also very male. Maybe that’s because only 19% of computer science graduates in the U.S. are women.

In an effort to increase female employment, some tech companies are using CSR to increase gender diversity. This might not be an obvious solution. What is the relationship between corporate social responsibility and hiring more women?

Recruiting Responsibly:  Corporate Social Responsibility is Key for Job Seekers

The idea of corporate social responsibility is hardly new. In particular, global and environmentally impactful companies have been historically sensitive to the role of public service. A company that earns billions, seen re-investing some of that wealth, either to the local community or a high profile cause is good PR.

Companies that operate refineries, factories, or other activities that emit exceptional noise or fumes tend to be sensitive to building relationships with local residents. Pharmaceutical organisations have often spearheaded campaigns to address diseases and other medical needs of at-risk communities in developing countries. But what is relatively new is the employee demand

My Year of Thinking Dangerously: A Professional Breakthrough

About 18 months ago I was feeling pretty good. My team at work was doing well and creating massive impact. We enjoyed the respect of both the business leaders and our peers in HR. Business schools and professional groups were seeking our input for lectures, case studies and guidance. I had more opportunities to co-author books, lecture and research than I had time for…and the headhunters kept calling. Not only were they calling me…but everyone on our team. Like sirens of the lake, each call promised the riches of fame and fortune.

It couldn’t get any better. As they say down

What I learned about leadership at the bottom of an African coal mine

I am only one of two corporate psychologists I know of who has worked at the bottom of a coal mine, let alone one in a remote part of Africa.  There I learned three important lessons about decision-making, teams, leadership and social impact.

I place a high value on rolling up my sleeves and getting out in the field to actually see customers and products in action. If I didn’t, I would become distanced from reality

I once had a client in the mining industry.  While working out in the field with some of the leaders, my colleague Bill and I had