What to Do About Corporate Culture During the Pandemic

During these difficult times, there’s constant anxiety on both a personal and professional level. Everyone is on high alert about their own health, as well as their loved ones. For those negatively impacted economically, there’s fear about making rent and paying bills. And for those still working, many are trying to adjust to an office job performed from a kitchen table or the living room sofa. But individual responses to the coronavirus aren’t the only change in the current environment. There’s also pressure on organisations to find ways to adjust. Some companies are considering permanently switching to remote

Gen X Leaders Should Embrace Millennial Corporate Values. Mostly.

Millennials have changed the workforce in countless ways. That’s not all bad, of course, and Gen X leaders should embrace Millennial corporate values (some of them, anyway). Millennials have changed the face of companies, literally, with more diverse employees. They’ve changed employee expectations, with more emphasis on things they care about, like CSR efforts and a voice in their career. And they generally have questioned – even rejected — many of the professional norms (read: restraints) around dress codes, organization charts and communication style.

Here are three ways that Gen X leaders should embrace Millennial

The Bottom Line on Loftier Goals: It Might Be Gen X who make CSR relevant

As we discussed in an earlier post on Millennial recruiting, 85% of Millennials in the US said they wanted their company to provide CSR opportunities for them, and 64% said they will not work for a company that doesn’t, according to this study. Companies are quickly shifting how they invest in CSR as a necessary part of business. That’s driven by Millennial prioritisation of employee and consumer decision-making. But it might be Gen X who make CSR relevant to the business model, financially, and not just ideologically. They have the track record, and moment-in-time advantages

Cultural fit matters. But maybe it’s time to call it cultural add.

The other day, a friend of mine told me about a new employee at her office. The woman on first glance was just another twenty-something new hire with what my friend called “appropriate business look”. Apparently the woman had an unremarkable hairstyle in a natural-looking colour (“no streaks of purple or green”), simple jewelry (“only her ears were pierced”), and a tailored, silk blouse. At the meeting, she was articulate and well-informed on the subject matter, with insightful questions and useful ideas. Then, when she raised her hand to make a point . . .she revealed a sleeve

X Marks the Top – How Gen X is Driving Change in Organisations

Jeff Bezos is, at the time of this writing, the wealthiest person in the world. Born in 1964, Bezos is on the cusp of Baby Boomers and Gen X. Some say Gen X started a year or two later, so you can find whichever definition you want to claim him or not. But you can’t deny the changes Amazon has brought to consumers and businesses, and Bezos aside, you can’t deny that Gen X is driving change in organisations more generally. The founders of Google were both born in 1973. Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook, was born in 1969. Jack

Teaching A New Dog Old Tricks – Attracting Younger Talent to “Old” Companies

If we told you that one of the hot new trends for socialising was throwing axes — at a bar, no less – you might tell us that is so early 2018. But if we told you axe-throwing has become an increasingly common corporate event? (Come on, you didn’t see that coming, really. And if you work in the insurance sector, you might not for a while yet.) At best, such unusual corporate-sponsored activities seem inextricably linked with Silicon Valley start-ups. But established, more traditional companies are increasingly realising the importance of modernising their employee recruiting and hiring strategies, in